Tuesday, June 19, 2007

ERASE HATE


Please SIGN THE 'ERASE HATE' PETITION - HELP ERASE HATE.

Show your support for the Matthew Shepard Act by signing the Erase Hate Petition. Let your voice be heard and help us in our mission to Erase Hate. To sign please go to: http://www.matthewshepardfoundation.org/

HELP PASS THE MATTHEW SHEPARD ACT IN THE SENATE - ACT NOW! On May 3, the United States House passed the federal hate crimes legislation with bi-partisan support (237 - 180). The legislation now heads to the United States Senate, where it has been renamed the Matthew Shepard Act. In response to this, Judy Shepard, Executive Director of the Matthew Shepard Foundation, said "I can’t think of a better way to honor Matthew’s memory. He was a 21-year-old college student just living his life."

ERASE HATE PETITIONThe Matthew Shepard Act is an appropriate and measured response to the unrelenting and under-addressed problem of violent hate crimes committed against individuals based on actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender, gender identity and disability. All people regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or ability deserve to be free from violence and crimes committed because of hatred and bias.

CALL NOW!
ASK YOUR SENATORS TO SUPPORT THE MATTHEW SHEPARD ACT
202-224-3121 and ask for your Senator's office

Tuesday, June 12, 2007

War All The Time


Male Veterans Have Double the Suicide Rate of Civilians

Male veterans in the general U.S. population are twice as likely as their civilian peers to die by suicide, a large study shows. This study included 320,890 men age 18 and older in the general population, 104,026 of them veterans, whom researchers followed for 12 years. Veterans who were white, had at least 12 years of education, or whose daily-life activities were limited by health problems were at highest risk. Those who were overweight had a lower risk. By the end of the study, 197 of the veterans had died by suicide. Compared to civilian men who died by suicide, veterans were 58 percent more likely to use a firearm to end their lives. The researchers also note that the number of veterans with daily-life activity limitations – one of the higher risk factors for suicide listed above – is likely to rise. They suggest that clinical and community interventions will be needed, and call for clinicians to be alert for signs that veterans might be contemplating suicide and to assess their access to firearms.